Jessica Dubin

Bio

Category/Medium:

Studio Location:
7 Dogwood Road, Cortlandt, NY

Telephone Number:
737-8066

Jessica Dubin

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Peekskill Arts Council Member Image
Peekskill Arts Council Member Image
Peekskill Arts Council Member Image

 

    As a maker of objects I am primarily concerned with essence.  My work is driven by the desire to discover and express the essence of that which is common or everyday.  The objects that I make aspire to exist in a paradoxical manner.  On the one hand they are completely recognizable.  They are rooted in the tradition of use, and as such, depend upon that realm for their meaning and value.  In contrast, they are also intimate objects which reside within the context of private ritual. Here they have the potential to become personal metaphors, sources of comfort and even embodiments of spirit.

     Clay as a material is exceptionally sensitive to the nuances of manipulation. Its physicality bears witness to the gesture and spirit of the maker. For this reason, it is imperative that my life, and the work that issues forth from it coincide. There is inherent tension, both in life and work, between spontaneity and containment. Polar opposites, these conditions necessitate mutual definition. I aim to strike a balance within this tension when I work. My pottery is thrown on the wheel using soft clay. As the pot nears completion a rib or my fingers are used to create a visible gesture or spiral effect. Later, the piece may be further manipulated to take it slightly "off" round.  The marks I leave on the form are intentional and deeply considered. I am interested in the subtle unpredictability of the pot and moving the eye around and through the form.

     I strive to create a rich dialogue between form and surface. The color and texture in my work is informed by the natural world; by moss and stone, bark and hair and skin. The surfaces are intentional to the extent that I am able to control their application, but not the fire that inevitably changes them. Thus, they are subject to chance, a variable that penetrates the very core of existence. The forms I choose to work with, bottles, bowls, pouring implements, are among the most basic and ancient forms in the ceramic vocabulary. I am intrigued and challenged by them.  I often feel that my work is guided by a sort of primordial memory.  It is a memory that knows, before knowing remembers.  A memory that evokes the elements of a natural history seldom seen, but eternally and deeply felt.